Pentagon seeks additive manufacturing to spur hypersonic development

A hypersonics illustration is seen on the show floor Oct. 11, 2022, at the Association of the U.S. Army annual convention in Washington, D.C. (Colin Demarest/C4ISRNET)

A hypersonics illustration is seen on the show floor Oct. 11, 2022, at the Association of the U.S. Army annual convention in Washington, D.C. (Colin Demarest/C4ISRNET)

AM Chronicle Editor

SHARE
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin
Share on twitter

The Pentagon wants to use an advanced technology process known as additive manufacturing to design and build hypersonic weapon and vehicle systems that can operate in extreme conditions.

More from the News 

As the U.S. Department of Defense looks to field its first hypersonic capability in fiscal 2023, officials emphasize the need to shore up the industrial base and ensure programs can smoothly transition from development to production. Through an initiative called Growing Additive Manufacturing Maturity for Airbreathing Hypersonics, or GAMMA-H, it’s targeting materials and processes used to build systems that travel and maneuver above Mach 5.

In a request for proposals issued Oct. 28, the department asked companies large and small, as well as academia, to submit prototype proposals for developing hypersonic components using additive manufacturing, which leverages computer-aided design software and often advanced materials to build components.

“We need to be pushing the envelope with materials produced using the additive manufacturing process,” Kevin DeVries, deputy director of the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Manufacturing Technology Program, said in a statement. “The science has proven it’s possible, but the practice is not widespread enough. GAMMA-H will encourage further adoption of groundbreaking technology.”

Because the parts used to build hypersonic systems must operate under extreme conditions, they require advanced specifications and materials that can withstand high temperatures and other mechanical stress. The premise of GAMMA-H is that additive manufacturing techniques could help improve the quality of those parts and reduce the number of components needed to build a vehicle or weapon.

The Navy is leading the effort in partnership with the Manufacturing Technology program office. Proposals are due Dec. 12, and the department aims to move through the selection process quickly, though it gave no timeline.

Subscribe to AM Chronicle Newsletter to stay connected:  https://bit.ly/3fBZ1mP 

Follow us on LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/3IjhrFq 

Visit for more interesting content on additive manufacturing: https://www.amchronicle.com

Original Source

  • Tags

You May Also Like

Related Content

About the Author

Author Profile

AM Chronicle Editor